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Not Very Quiet: The anthology

$24.95

Over the last five years, from the #Me Too Movement to same-sex marriage, from devastating bush fires to the global pandemic, the online poetry journal Not Very Quiet has dedicated itself to publishing women’s voices from across the globe. Not Very Quiet: The anthology selects poetry that has given voice to the social conscience of the community, constructions of lesbian and queer, the challenges posed to the social construction of gender, as well as the complexities and possibilities of the human condition.

Edited by Moya Pacey & Sandra Renew

 

Homings and Departures: Selected poems from contemporary China and Australia

$24.95

This bilingual Homings and Departures anthology presents the absorbing and compelling poetry of 41 outstanding Australian poets in both English and Mandarin. The anthology is the result of a collaboration between poets, scholars and translators from the China Australia Writing Centre at Curtin University, Western Australia; the International Poetry Studies group at the University of Canberra; and Fudan University in Shanghai. Edited by Lucy Dougan and Paul Hetherington, it reflects the importance of international literary and cultural connections as a way of extending our conceptions of ‘home’ and ‘elsewhere’.

What We Carry: Poetry on childbearing

$24.95

What We Carry brings together the voices of more than 60 contemporary Australian poets to provide accounts of childbearing that are both lyrical and embodied. Featuring diverse voices and perspectives on experiences of infertility, conception, termination, loss, pregnancy, birth and the early postpartum period, this collection illuminates the endlessly different ways the potential to carry life is experienced. The poems invite you to share incredibly personal stories – some humourous, some sincere, some full of elation and love, others frustration or despair. They provide powerful insights into the potential for childbearing experiences to shape us, change the trajectories of our lives, and teach us about what it means to be human. For after all, all of us were carried, at the beginning.

Edited by Ella Kurz, Simone King and Claire Delahunty

Divining Dante

$24.95

2021 is the 700th anniversary of the death of Dante Alighieri, author of the long narrative poetic trilogy, The Divine Comedy. In a time of global pandemic, Dante’s exploration of the relationship between the physical and spiritual worlds and humankind’s responsibilities to each other seems particularly relevant, and to commemorate Dante’s anniversary we invited 70 poets from around the world to respond to Dante’s famous work, assisted by a team of seven contributing editors: Paul Munden (UK), Nessa O’Mahony (Ireland), Paul Hetherington (Australia), Alvin Pang (Singapore), Priya Sarukkai Chabria (India), Moira Egan (Italy) and David Fenza (US).

Edited by Paul Munden and Nessa O’Mahony.

The free online version of Divining Dante is now available here. 

 

Ferocious Animals

$24.95

An early exchange of Christmas presents leads to a violent outcome for a young drunk couple. A schoolboy finds himself at the centre of a cruel playground bullying ritual. A teenage girl lies to her mother about a sexual assault involving her little sister. A father ruins grand final day for the son who idolises him. 

The thirteen stories in Luke Johnson’s debut collection do not shy away from life’s brutalities. Nor do they overlook those moments of genuine  intimacy, humour and revelation that imbue the tragic with purpose and with pathos. Set in regional Australia in an era before mobile phones and the internet, these stories will remind you of who and what we are beneath all the cool digital interfaces: animals, burning with ferocity for a mouthful of life’s flesh.

Poet to Poet: Contemporary Women Poets from Japan

$24.95

This anthology collects 10 of the finest contemporary women poets working in Japan today and offers translations that reinterpret the work as poetry in English. The result is an edgy, compelling, beautiful group of works, presented in a bi-lingual format, that challenges perceptions of contemporary Japanese life, culture and history.

Incantations

$22.95

In Incantations, Subhash Jaireth responds through a series of short prose pieces  to portraits of famous and everyday Australians in an attempt to rethink the role of place, identity and the self. It is an ekphrastic exercise, in that it reinterprets an artwork in writing, but it is also a lyrical exploration of what art can mean: its power to move, to know, and to feel.

Equations of Breath

$19.95

‘Lucy Alexander’s Equations of Breath is a questing volume of poetry and prose poetry that frequently tantalises the ineffable. It probes the intimate connections between people, and human relationships to the more-than-human world. At its core is a series of moving poems illustrating memory’s connection to identity and perception. Equations of Breath also deals poignantly with the experience of dementia and the complex relationships between parents and children. This book is imagistic and linguistically playful, powerfully foregrounding the importance of the imagination.’
Paul Hetherington

‘Lucy Alexander’s fourth collection conjures landscapes where the line between internal and external worlds blurs. What strikes in these intimate poems is breath. Here it is tight. There it is released with relief, longing or grief. Here the ‘blue and yellow of time’ bleed into each other along phylogenetic lines. There ‘is no time in the present’ and ‘love is a measure of distance.’ Vulnerable and defying Equations of Breath beckons for its craft and care.’
Dominique Hecq

The Dancing Man

$19.95

In the face of fire, flood and plague, environmental catastrophe and political chaos, the challenge is that poetry, in Auden’s words, ‘show an affirming flame’.
The poems in The Dancing Man are an attempt to move from grief and loss towards consolations, however limited these might be. Intimations of connection and inter-dependence between all living things is the fragile basis for a first step towards spiritual re-orientation and an art of hope.

Five Oceans

$19.95

In these prose poem sequences, five different tastes are explored, not only with reference to food and drink,but also through their metaphorical use. There are innumerable ways of ‘tasting’ and apprehending theworld, and these poems canvass a wide range of them while also encouraging readers to consider their own diverse tastes, preferences and experiences.

On the Record

$19.95

Utilising comprehensive research undertaken at the National Records of Scotland, On the Record takes as its starting point the death certificates of a number of Martin Dolan’s direct ancestors. Each poem imagines itself into the thoughts of its subject/speaker, developing a mosaic that gives a small sight of Scottish social history, primarily in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Everything Feeds It

$19.95

I missed it, the entire history of our blue world.

How many heads rolled? Did they go defiantly?

I will sacrifice myself by becoming an automaton.

 

It is all too much! The past and future have coalesced into a spherical twister of succulents, stardust, money boxes and chatbots. You keep it together with outstretched arms, a child of this earth wielding a hurricane. All that is you whirling about in the mix: erotic books and bull ants, blackbirds and stoic philosophers. The whole world caught in a balancing act of blue whales and human brains, super computers and microplastics. As a matter of survival, you start bringing it together, moulding it firmly into the density of a dark star. A volatile idea pushed heavily inward, until it takes shape in your clamped hands. When you take a look, there is an ancient fruit – an apricot, with a modest blush. It is exquisite! But if you plant it, what will grow? If you eat it, what will you become?

The Sea Chest

$19.95

The Sea Chest is a visceral, moving, and emotionally layered account of life in the aftermath of loss. In 2017, Kerry Greer’s husband Gabriel ended his life with horrific violence, dying on the kitchen floor of his parents’ home.

Haunting in its honesty, and underpinned by a connection to the spirituality of the natural world, The Sea Chest traces the impact of Gabriel’s death over years and continents. The collection provides a counter-narrative to ideas of grief portrayed in sympathy cards or Hollywood movies. There is no redemptive narrative arc, no going “back to normal.” But there is the old love—the indissoluble thread that is now called grief.

Imagistic and probing, The Sea Chest speaks directly into the void. In the stillness, in the grey: a ripple, an answer from the ether, asking the reader to listen, to not turn away. The Sea Chest becomes a holding space for grief—for the things which cannot be said out loud, but which need to be voiced. This is poetry as invocation, poetry as love enacted, poetry as gateway to the liminal and the sacred.

The Daily News

$19.95

This collection traces the period from 2019, and the catastrophe fires in Australia, through the COVID years and beyond, feeling its way into how we live in the world, and how we might reflect on the value of listening to the many voices that make up our everyday experience. Written primarily in prose poetry, it attempts to expand the capacity of the sentence, rather than the line, to gesture toward what is rarely said (or cannot be said), and to offer fragments of stories about finding a home in the world as it is, and as we are.  

The Gospel of Unmade Creation

$19.95

The Gospel of Unmade Creation, the debut collection by Thabani Tshuma, is about reshaping. It is an examination of the ways we are taken apart and put back together and what exists in that space before ‘rebuilding’ or ‘recovery’. This book is a truth, in the way truth can be both something made and something that already exists. It is an origin story told in non-linear vignettes. Part-testament, part-tome, part exercise in reflection, the poems in The Gospel of Unmade Creation traverse scene, theme, space, and time in search of a sense of ‘self’.

Feldspar

$19.95

Feldspar, the new collection of poetry from Brendan Ryan, is unflinching in its focus on rural landscapes, the treatment of farm animals and the humble lives of people often missing from poetry. There are odes to invigilators, truck drivers, a family member who took to walking, laments for dogs and the hardened realities of country living. A sense of longing for and loss from the country is a sub-text for poems that reveal how place is never only a geographical location, but more of a state of mind to be revisited again and again and where belonging can also be found in music, driving or looking at the country you inevitably return to.

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