New Recent Work

It’s the longest November on record, and the night sky is bright with swans and eagles …

Tract is the third anthology of prose poems from the Prose Poetry Project, a group of over twenty poets from across Australia, Singapore, and the UK who collaborate on writing in this fluid form. This anthology features two sequences of prose poems: one characterised by the single moment; the other reflecting longer durations. Placed on opposing pages, the conversation between the two echoes the vibrant and enduring poetic practice of this group.

come closer newcomer and see...dew and broken glass...nestled along the river...glistening...steam rising...

Set in the heart of Australia, Penny Drysdale's debut collection  breaks open the prison of self to lay bare the many contradictions in contemporary Australian relationships.  Love, injustice and ‘unbelonging’ weave their way through this torrid landscape like ancient creatures on a grand scale.  A credit card, a mouse trap, a discarded car battery, a pile of children’s clothing all become an opportunity to examine in harsh Australian light aspects of ourselves we usually confine to the dark. 

Cities are as complex and unknowable as they are familiar and unsurprising. We can feel as if we know a city intimately, or merely indicate its mysteries to our fleeting perceptions. Or its mysteries can appear in and through the mundane. Cities reveal their collective ghosts through their landscapes, their histories, their people, their sounds and smells. Cities ask us to invent not only ourselves, but a view of ourselves within the cityscape we imagine.

In this Recent Work Anthology, we asked ten poets to write about cities around the globe, to construct new perspectives on these cities and, if only for a moment, hear their rhythms, and find their meanings.

Their naked bodies, kneeling
in secular prayer, were shadows
playing on the wall

The title poem of this collection chronicles the eighteenth-century trial of Captain John Bolton for the murder of his apprentice girl, Elizabeth Rainbow, in a small village in the north of England where Paul Munden has spent most of his life. The poem's reflection on the life writing process is complemented by other shadowings, glimpses of strange complicities and dark pastoral musings.

All the men I have ever loved ride bicycles.
But in the end, a bicycle humming between your legs
Guarantees more happiness than a man.

Miranda Lello’s debut collection is a deeply felt and often playful reflection on the liminal moments of contemporary life.  Lello’s keen eye searches out the possibilities of new worlds as they exist in the everyday moments of work, of journeys, of love, and of living. This is a collection written on the body and mind and invested in the capacity of poetry to make us feel.

2016 Editions

IPSI Chapbooks